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Jay Kinghorn's Blog | Does the screen shape your work?
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Inspiration

Does the screen shape your work?


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Discussion

One comment for “Does the screen shape your work?”


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  1. I think you are onto something important, Jay, that is influencing us all, regardless of how conscious of it we are or not. I would think that being aware of these factors consciously would be important for serious photographers, but then I realize, maybe not. After all, you evolved without being aware of why.

    I’ve found myself thinking recently, “The Web has made us all black and white photographers,” which might seem odd considering how popular vibrant, saturated colors have become. My thought related to the realization, like yours, that simpler compositions read better on the Web, and that we also probably respond more to general tonality than to subtle color differences — more “black and white.”

    The fact that we might evolve to be less picky about more subtle color differences seems like it would happen as a matter of course given the lack of standard color experiences due to extreme variations among monitors — even when dealing with color calibrated machines.

    While evaluating an image through a loupe once made great sense, if we are on to something with this thinking, it might make good sense for today’s photographers to evaluate images on a monitor crowed with other images, and then to squint fairly tight to bring out the compositional elements and downplay the color.

    Posted by Ethan G. Salwen | October 28, 2010, 3:33 pm

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