// you’re reading...

Uncategorized

Are your photos safe?

This morning, I came into my office and found that someone had tried to break into my office using a screwdriver to pop the lock on the door.

Fortunately for me, unfortunate for the thief, they were unsuccessful. Still, the event raises the question of what would have happened to my photos if the thief had cleaned out my office including my hard drives and computers.

Many photographers have an backup system designed to protect against the failure of a single hard drive. Less common is a backup system to protect against a catastrophic loss like a flood, fire or theft.

In my office, I use a WiebeTech RAID 1 system for photos and project files that is backed up to drives stored off-site at least once a week. Much of my business correspondence, word docs etc. are mirrored between my desktop, laptop and Amazon S3 storage. Trying to backup photos in the cloud is difficult owing to the large file size.

So, in this case, there would have been some time needed to get reestablished with new computers and reinstall software, but otherwise, my photo library, invoices, client files and emails would be safe.

A scare like this is always a good chance to review your backup procedures. Would you be protected if a thief broke into your home or office and stole your computer equipment and hard drives?

Discussion

4 comments for “Are your photos safe?”

  1. Wow, Jay, that is scary. I’m glad the crook didn’t get in and nothing was stolen. Also relieved that you weren’t there.

    Posted by Bettina Faltermeier | March 24, 2009, 12:37 pm
  2. Me too. Come to find out others have had problems in the same building. Regardless, we’re looking at other options for our offices.

    Posted by jay | March 24, 2009, 8:28 pm
  3. Glad to hear things turned out, I was noting that my backup drive was sitting next to my computer last night, kind of like having your spare key, inside the house.

    Posted by Art Stevens | March 27, 2009, 1:56 pm
  4. Perfect analogy Art. Make sure you at least have the “hide-a-key” in a safe location.

    Posted by jay | March 27, 2009, 4:20 pm

Post a comment