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Newsweeklies Continue Long, Slow Print Goodbye

This last week has been an alarming one in the world of print journalism. Scripps media, owners of the Rocky Mountain News, have put the Rocky up for sale and the Tribune Co, owners of the LA Times, Chicago Tribune and Baltimore Sun has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

Today’s announcement that Newsweek is looking at slashing its base circulation rate from 2.6 million copies to just over 1 million per issue is a poor omen for the magazine industry. Some within the industry are already seeing this as the death knell for print journalism.

Within these ominous announcements are signs that magazines and newspapers may be discovering their role in the Internet economy. Time magazine’s managing editor recently said:

“There’s no news that breaks in print anymore. Print takes the facts and adds insight. Online is for the ‘what’ and print is for the ‘why’. The magazine puts it in context…”

“There’s no news that breaks in print anymore. Print takes the facts and adds insight. Online is for the ‘what’ and print is for the ‘why’. The magazine puts it in context…”

This may be great news for photographers who are comfortable shooting longer-form editorial articles. It would be as difficult to visually convey the context of a sensitive issue using images from the AP newswire or stock service as it would be to piece together a written article from wire clippings. Telling these kinds of stories effectively requires a singular, coherent vision, not a scattershot visual approach.

It will be interesting to watch how the next two years unfold. News of job losses and closures is always painful. I can only hope that on the other end of this crisis newer, stronger businesses will emerge and with it a cadre of visual artists capable of translating the complexity of the modern world into a series of stunning photographs.

Newsweeklies Continue Long, Slow Print Goodbye – Consumer @ FolioMag.com: “”

(Via: Folio Mag .)

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